Country dating show

The shows are highly popular in Turkey, but attract thousands of complaints every year, the Guardian reported.“There are some strange programs that would scrap the institution of family, take away its nobility and sanctity,” Kurtulmuş said in an interview with a provincial TV channel last month.“We are working on this and we are coming to the end of it.God willing, in the near future, we will most likely remedy this with an emergency decree,” Kurtulmuş added.The Turkish government issued two new decrees this weekend, including one that bans popular TV and radio dating programs, the Associated Press reported.The country’s Official Gazette published the decrees late Saturday evening.

But ever since ABC created the monster that is The Bachelor at the turn of the century, the quest to find true love on TV has become a season-long process more arduous than a presidential campaign. , just about every romantic reality show to air in the past decade has been built on this model.

Far from manipulating its participants and situations to increasingly ridiculous extremes, the Ellen De Generes-produced show simply pairs two strangers up, films every minute of their squirm-inducing/sparks-flying dinner table conversation at MK, a cozy Chicago restaurant, and then asks them whether they want their first date to lead to a second. The brainchild of Twenty Twenty Productions (the team behind life-fixing reality show Brat Camp and life-affirming BAFTA winner The Choir), the original version first hit British screens in 2013.

A word-of-mouth success, the show gradually became one of the Channel 4 network’s flagship hits; 69 episodes, including several celebrity specials, have aired since.

The decree banning TV dating shows is just one example of the kind of edicts that have been ordered.

Earlier this month, Turkish President Racep Tayyp Erdogan won a referendum that cemented his authoritarian control over the state.