Stolen webcam chat footage updating health card

Scammers may use carefully prepared webcam images or footage of themselves which may initially seem flattering, but can increasingly become coercive and explicit.

They steadily increase pressure on you to participate, which they record and later threaten to distribute online.

While You Tube’s own algorithm has taken down many of these videos, the DCA has called on Google to police their service better, asking them to consider their own company ethos ‘don’t be evil’ when judging whether hackers making tutorial videos should be allowed to profit through ad-revenue.“Ratters don’t need any help getting victims, but they stand to make money from the RAT tutorials posted on You Tube,” argues the DCA’s Deputy Executive Director Adam Benson.

“We found hundreds of tutorials with ads from well-known, respected companies.

The anonymous user turned these sessions into a real online show.

For example when a handful of victims approached their computers, he opened up a pornographic video in the browser right when they came close to their devices.

It streamed video from thousands of webcams located in 250 world countries.

He told them to do their worst and release the footage. Exact statistics are difficult to come by, as many people who are attacked don't go to police or make their situation public.

But then they replied with a screenshot of his Facebook friends, and personal details from his website. Security software companies, who may have an interest in exaggerating the threat, say they have detected vast numbers of attacks.

According to one, there were more than 200,000 ransomware attacks in Australia in April-May alone this year.

According to another, there were more than one million instances of a single kind of ransomware (Crypto Locker) in Australia in October last year.